Storm Prediction Center Endeavors to Save Lives, Prevent Damage

March 21, 2014

 It is that time of year to start talking about and planning for the 2014 Tornado season which runs from April-October.  The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is a branch of the National Weather Service and its stated mission is to protect the life and property of Americans through accurate watch and forecasts of hazardous weather. It watches for severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across the contiguous United States and also monitors heavy rain and snow as well as fire weather.

 

The SPC is able to relay weather forecasts and warnings up to three days ahead of time through a process that begins with a convective outlook that forecasts where severe and non-severe storms are expected to occur across the country. These storms are then labeled according to risk level from a slight risk of severe weather resulting from the storm to a high risk. The SPC relies on meteorologists for its forecasts and also researches severe weather at its center in Norman, Oklahoma.

 

While the Storm Prediction Center is able to predict many storms and help people to know when a storm is headed in their direction, wind, rain and other weather phenomena still can cause severe storm damage. If your property has suffered weather-related damage and its time to file a claim, using the services of a public adjuster can help you to get the best insurance settlement possible. On average, our firm gets for our clients 30 to 40 percent more than what the insurance company proposes.

 

Because Texas law prohibits the public adjuster from also providing reconstruction services, you can be assured that the public adjuster services offered by Timmons Consulting Group are conflict-free. For more information on how we can help you get the insurance settlement you need and deserve when the weather causes damage to your property, contact us.

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